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Media interviewed (Going Places) of our SPI, Chief of Spiritual, Cultural Beliefs Research and Gadget Department), Mr Kenneth Jee

 

 

Media interviewed (Going Places) of our SPI, Chief Paranormal Investigator ( Spiritual, Cultural Beliefs Research and Gadget Department), Mr Kenneth Jee

Source :
http://www.goingplacessingapore.sg/project/2013/ParanormalConnections.aspx

 

Paranormal connections

Even among Singapore’s planned and compact landscape, pockets of abandoned buildings and places remain. Paranormal investigators give their take on why they still exist.

By Cassandra Yeap     |     12 Nov 2013

 

Paranormal investigator Benjamin Teo used to be scared of ghosts. A visit by what appeared to be his dead great grandmother when he was in primary school, left him with the creeps.

 

But years on, his job as a social worker challenged him to act on advice he often gave the youths he counselled – and to confront his fears.

 

“The more I researched, and with more information, I began to feel differently towards [ghosts]. And that’s when I started to explore to see if I could conquer my fears by going to these places,” he said.

 

Old, isolated and empty places beckon Benjamin. Despite Singapore’s small land area, pockets of untouched properties and swathes of deserted land remain – sometimes inexplicably so. Paranormal investigators like him seek to understand why.

 

According to Benjamin, 34, founder of Ghost Club SG, buildings may be abandoned because they were repossessed or the subject of a property dispute. But occasionally, darker phenomena are at work.

 

“A tragic event could have happened there, and sometimes people don’t want to buy it because of its history. It could also be that certain things that happened there, created situations such that people who stay there, don’t stay there for long.

 

“It could really be some paranormal incidents.”

 

Flagging the supernatural
Benjamin encountered one such incident five years ago at Kent Ridge Park’s parade square, the one-time stomping ground of British soldiers. Arriving after sundown, the daytime serenity of the park had turned to a silence that seemed especially sinister.

 

“That night when we went we could really feel that there was something different, it was especially dark,” he said. Intrigued, he and his club members began a thorough sweep of the area, eventually zeroing in on the parade square’s three flag poles, long disused. A persistent clanging sound abruptly started and went on for a few minutes – the middle pole’s pulley system hitting repeatedly against the pole.

 

There were no animals or birds nearby, and no wind to disturb the pulley, said Benjamin. Meanwhile, the ropes of the two flanking poles did not budge.

 

“We didn’t know what it was. At the end of the day, we deemed it as inconclusive, as an unexplainable thing,” said Benjamin. “That remains a mystery till today.”

 

Fatal attraction
Chief Paranormal Investigator with the Singapore Paranormal Investigators (SPI) Kenneth Jee, 37, believes the histories of abandoned buildings are what draw paranormal activity.

 

“For example, old buildings which had ‘bad happenings’ in them, hospitals with a lot of deaths, and massacre sites,” he said.

 

The fact that the building is abandoned also further draws unnatural presences.

 

“[Ghosts are] just like humans, we don’t like to be disturbed.”

 

Agreeing, Benjamin said conflicting auras make places that are devoid of people, a welcoming place for ghosts.

 

“People actually give off the yang qi, or positive energy, so places that have many people – usually ghosts will not want to be there because they’re considered the yin qi (negative energy), so there’s a clash, he said.

 

Investigators typically use a range of instruments to capture evidence of supernatural activity. These include sensors that measure electromagnetic fields, voice recorders to capture white noise or sounds of lower frequency known as Electric Voice Phenomena, and night vision cameras.

 

Kenneth, who also heads SPI’s Spiritual, Cultural Beliefs Research and Gadget Department, said the group usually brings five or more pieces of equipment, and assesses the likelihood of a haunting based on how many register positive readings.

 

Always spooky
But in Singapore’s fast-changing landscape, even buildings thought by investigators to likely be haunted, are not left untouched for long.

 

Often, signs that forbid trespassing or that mark buildings as state property spring up overnight, said Kenneth, leaving fewer and fewer places for his group to explore.

 

Nonetheless, developing or renovating a building has little effect on its supernatural visitors.

 

“If there is really a haunting there, whether it’s developed or whether there’s a new building, the energies will still remain. These energies do not change when the physical surroundings change; they are still there,” said Benjamin.

 

To remove the area of such “energies”, the investigators suggested complete demolition, excavation to the depth of six feet and leaving the soil exposed for a week.

 

A change of pace
It is not just the physical landscape that is becoming scarcer for abandoned places. To be sensitive to the supernatural implies a respect for the environment that is slowly fading among younger Singaporeans because of their hectic lifestyles, said Kenneth, who runs a chain of new age shops with his cousin.

 

“How many of us actually spend our time taking off our shoes, walking barefoot on the grass? What’s the feeling at that point in time? How many would actually relax, breathe?” he asked.

 

“Because when you talk about the paranormal, it’s no different from other things, like a connection to nature. A person who is connected to nature will be spiritual and a person who is spiritual will be sensitive to the paranormal,” he said.

 

To Benjamin, gaining insight into the paranormal has also been a window for him onto Singapore.

 

“Whether it’s exploring parks or going to these places, when I do my research, there’s tons of information I found that was also educational to me, like what happened in the 1950s or 1800s,” he said. Learning about the varieties of local ghosts also helped him to see other cultures in a different light.

 

“I think vice versa, when [my friends] hear about the seventh month traditions and superstitions, there’s a lot of learning and appreciation of each other’s culture,” he said.

 

Abandoned buildings and places have value as part of Singapore’s heritage and history; while their physical structures may have fallen into disrepair, their stories, even the tragic ones, should be preserved, said Benjamin. To understand Singapore, one needed to go beyond the shopping malls and cinemas, Benjamin added.

 

“I think there’s a lot more to see out there,” he said. And he doesn’t just mean in the physical realm.

Nam Koo Terrace – The Wan Chai Haunted House

Nam Koo Terrace – The Wan Chai Haunted House
Ghosts and Hauntings

November 2003 a group of eight middle school students decided to visit the local areas haunted location. Their plan was to stay the night in the hopes of getting a glimpse of one of the resident spirits.

Their hopes high for a night of mystery, intrigue and a few steps will have no doubt turned to uncertainty as they crossed the threshold into Nam Koo Terrace. It is said a feeling of appalling loneliness that is also confusingly felt along with the feeling of a crowded space hits those who enter the property.

This abandoned house is also known locally as the Wan Chai Haunted House and its legends no doubt grew to infamy as verbal recounts of what happened this night passed from neighbour to neighbour, through the students of the local schools and child to child in the playground located close by.

That night the students set up their small camp in one of the empty rooms and decided to attempt to contact the spirits through their version of a ouija board. It was during this session that three of the girls in the group became agitated, their minds filling with terrible images.

One of the girls then completely flipped and became psychotic.

The students fled the building but as they made it to the gate the girl who had been most affected took on a strange persona and would not step off the property. It was at this stage the other two girls affected during the ouija session heard a male voice calling them to the second floor.

The police were called and when they tried to forcefully remove the girl she snapped and attacked them. It took both police officers to remove the girl and she was sent off to a hospital for psychiatric assessment and treatment, along with two of the other students who were emotionally affected by the nights activities.

The Oriental Daily newspaper ran the story and soon many other papers and media outlets followed suit. The legend of Nam Koo Terrace was now fully lodged in everyone’s psyche but the legends of ghosts and hauntings of this location go back quite a time.

The two story building was built in a period between 1915 and 1921 in the Wan Chai district of Hong Kong, China. The land was purchased and leased by prominent Chinese businessman ‘To Chun-man’. The house itself was designed to mimic European style houses while still incorporating facets of feng shui.

In the 1940’s the Japanese invaded and occupied Hong Kong. During this period the Japanese military turned Nam Koo Terrace, along with many other buildings in the district, into a military brothel. It remained as a brothel for four years until 1945.

It was during this period that the legends began starting with tales of local women being taken to the ‘comfort house’ to be repeatedly raped by the Japanese soldiers before being tortured and killed. Many of these women were said to have been decapitated by the soldiers before being dumped to be found by their friends and relatives.

Nam Koo Terrace is also known as a suicide house, a location where people come to end their own lives. As recently as 2010 bodies have been recovered from the rooms of the house or cut down from the branches of the gardens trees. It is not known how many people have ended their lives in the house but estimates put it at higher than 30.

Murder is also said to have taken place on the grounds several times.

Still, even with all the dark history and the hauntings people like to venture to the overgrown building. Urban explorers love to scale the sides of the derelict home or venture into the below ground ‘secret’ entrance.

The hauntings are made up of visions of headless or bloody women, their cries piercing the mind as blocking your ears does not lessen their impact. A man in black has been seen wandering the building and it is thought it was his voice the girls heard on that night in 2003.

‘Spectral fires’ have been reported but these at least can be chalked up to the squatters who have called the building home on and off through the years.

People who have entered the building say there is just something plain wrong with the feel of the place. What it feels like at night they are not quite sure as not many people are brave, or stupid enough, to visit it after the sun goes down.

Nam Koo Terrace is a Grade 1 Historical Building and as such is likely to stay around for a long time to come. Hopewell Holdings who plan to develop the area has stated that they aim to restore the old building and preserve its 90 years of history.

Ashley Hall 2013.

Picture: The front entrance and portico of Nam Koo Terrace
Inset Upper: A view of the left hand structure of the building.
Inset Middle: An interior shot showing the place a stairwell used to be located.
Inset Bottom: From the back porch, a view overlooking the city.

For more information about all things paranormal, strange, dark and macabre through articles, discussion, podcasts, videos and competitions visit The Paranormal Guide:
www.facebook.com/theparanormalguide

The Lady in White of Bachelor’s Grove


The Lady in White of Bachelor’s Grove
Paranormal Photos

In 1991, Ghost Research Society (GRS) investigator Jude Huff took many photos of the Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery located in the woods near Midlothian, Illinois. The GRS team had ventured out to the cemetery to explore the claims of paranormal happenings amongst the overgrown graves.

The team members walked through the cemetery in small groups, each holding a map and were told to record any changes in EMF and any psychic/anomalous experiences they may have had. The maps were compared, and several spots that overlapped showed in the comparisons.

The team members returned to those areas and did more in depth investigating, including taking many photographs.

It was upon development of these photos that the ‘Lady in White’ appeared, sitting on a headstone carved with a checker board pattern. No one was in the shot at the time the photos were taken, and no one in GRS was wearing the clothes seen on the figure in the photograph.

The woman can be seen sitting, legs to the front, with her hands in her lap. She has long hair (many believe this to be brown, although it is only a black and white image) and a full length dress. Many believe the dress to be a burial shroud, while others believe it is just an old fashioned light coloured dress.

The loose parts of her dress and areas around her head appear to be semi transparent. Everyone in the team was understandably stunned, as were the media, who soon snapped up the story and put it into print.
It is considered one of the top ten ghost photos of all time.
Who is this mysterious figure and why can she be seen staring off into the cemetery?

Bachelor’s Grove is no stranger to experiences of a potentially paranormal kind. These stories date as far back as the 1950′s, but with a location such as this, it would not be a surprise to find stories going back even further.

The tales take on many forms. The strangest concerns the road that leads to the cemetery itself. To access Bachelor’s Grove you must travel along a dark, long dirt track chocked by trees encroaching along the path, in many places blotting out the sun as the ancient boughs join overhead.

It is apparently quite freaky in the daytime, let alone terrifying at night. Back in the 50′s a story circulated that those who travelled the path would inexplicably see an old white farmhouse between the trunks and branches of the trees. Upon closer inspection, the house will have inexplicably disappeared. It is likely linked to the death of a farmer, who passed while ploughing the lands near the cemetery in 1870. He, his horse and the plough all fell into the nearby lagoon, drowning. Forest rangers have told tales how they have witnessed a farmer ploughing those fields, appearing and disappearing amongst the trees.

More modern stories concern strange lights in the cemetery. For the past forty-odd years it has been a place for adventurous (and no doubt horny) young people, wanting to hang out and ‘try their luck’. It was also no doubt a place to venture on a dare, or just for thrills.

It was these young people who started to report the lights. White flashes have been seen amongst the now overgrown stones, and paths between graves. Stories of robed monks were shared, though these seemed to die out in the mid-80′s.

In more recent times the stories evolved to include physical contact with unseen entities. The contact is always quite sudden and people claim the hands are clammy/sweaty, with the wetness lingering even as the shock of unexplainably being grabbed by an unseen force works its way throughout the body.
However, the most famous ghost is The White Lady. She has been seen amongst the graves of Bachelor’s Grove for decades. Many believe that her name is Mrs Rogers, a lady who buried in the cemetery next to her son. I can not find out why people believe the figure is Mrs Rogers, but the name seemed to have stuck.
The figure is also referred to as the ‘Madonna of Bachelor’s Grove’, no doubt owing to the light coloured nature of her flowing dress.
Since 2004, the woman has been referred to by another name. Mid West Haunts has spent many years investigating the old cemetery, and on one of these occasions they snapped a photo of the lady in white. She is seen standing amongst the trees in the area of a headstone for the grave of Dora Newman. Since that time MWH has been referring to the Lady in White as Dora Newman, hopefully she now has the correct name!
Ashley Hall 2013. All reference material can be made available on request.

Photo: The Lady in White, sometimes referred to as ‘The Madonna’ of Bachelor’s Grove.
Inset upper: The wooded path that leads to the cemetery.
Inset Middle: The headstone the apparition was seen sitting on.
Inset Lower: The gates of Bachelor’s Grove circa 1980

For more information about all things paranormal, strange, dark and macabre through articles, discussions, podcasts, videos and competitions visit The Paranormal Guide:
www.facebook.com/theparanormalguide

Want even more?
Visit our forums at www.theparanormalguide.net

Note: The Paranormal Guide makes no claims to the authenticity or integrity of this photo. It is simply presented here along with information for you to make up your own mind.

Bachelor’s Grove Lady in White

The Lady in White of Bachelor’s Grove
Paranormal Photos

In 1991, Ghost Research Society (GRS) investigator Jude Huff took many photos of the Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery located in the woods near Midlothian, Illinois. The GRS team had ventured out to the cemetery to explore the claims of paranormal happenings amongst the overgrown graves.

The team members walked through the cemetery in small groups, each holding a map and were told to record any changes in EMF and any psychic/anomalous experiences they may have had. The maps were compared, and several spots that overlapped showed in the comparisons.

The team members returned to those areas and did more in depth investigating, including taking many photographs.

It was upon development of these photos that the ‘Lady in White’ appeared, sitting on a headstone carved with a checker board pattern. No one was in the shot at the time the photos were taken, and no one in GRS was wearing the clothes seen on the figure in the photograph.

The woman can be seen sitting, legs to the front, with her hands in her lap. She has long hair (many believe this to be brown, although it is only a black and white image) and a full length dress. Many believe the dress to be a burial shroud, while others believe it is just an old fashioned light coloured dress.

The loose parts of her dress and areas around her head appear to be semi transparent. Everyone in the team was understandably stunned, as were the media, who soon snapped up the story and put it into print.

It is considered one of the top ten ghost photos of all time.

Who is this mysterious figure and why can she be seen staring off into the cemetery?

Bachelor’s Grove is no stranger to experiences of a potentially paranormal kind. These stories date as far back as the 1950’s, but with a location such as this, it would not be a surprise to find stories going back even further.

The tales take on many forms. The strangest concerns the road that leads to the cemetery itself. To access Bachelor’s Grove you must travel along a dark, long dirt track chocked by trees encroaching along the path, in many places blotting out the sun as the ancient boughs join overhead.

It is apparently quite freaky in the daytime, let alone terrifying at night. Back in the 50’s a story circulated that those who travelled the path would inexplicably see an old white farmhouse between the trunks and branches of the trees. Upon closer inspection, the house will have inexplicably disappeared. It is likely linked to the death of a farmer, who passed while ploughing the lands near the cemetery in 1870. He, his horse and the plough all fell into the nearby lagoon, drowning. Forest rangers have told tales how they have witnessed a farmer ploughing those fields, appearing and disappearing amongst the trees.

More modern stories concern strange lights in the cemetery. For the past forty-odd years it has been a place for adventurous (and no doubt horny) young people, wanting to hang out and ‘try their luck’. It was also no doubt a place to venture on a dare, or just for thrills.

It was these young people who started to report the lights. White flashes have been seen amongst the now overgrown stones, and paths between graves. Stories of robed monks were shared, though these seemed to die out in the mid-80’s.

In more recent times the stories evolved to include physical contact with unseen entities. The contact is always quite sudden and people claim the hands are clammy/sweaty, with the wetness lingering even as the shock of unexplainably being grabbed by an unseen force works its way throughout the body.

However, the most famous ghost is The White Lady. She has been seen amongst the graves of Bachelor’s Grove for decades. Many believe that her name is Mrs Rogers, a lady who buried in the cemetery next to her son. I can not find out why people believe the figure is Mrs Rogers, but the name seemed to have stuck.

The figure is also referred to as the ‘Madonna of Bachelor’s Grove’, no doubt owing to the light coloured nature of her flowing dress.

Since 2004, the woman has been referred to by another name. Mid West Haunts has spent many years investigating the old cemetery, and on one of these occasions they snapped a photo of the lady in white. She is seen standing amongst the trees in the area of a headstone for the grave of Dora Newman. Since that time MWH has been referring to the Lady in White as Dora Newman, hopefully she now has the correct name!

Ashley Hall 2013. All reference material can be made available on request.

Photo: The Lady in White, sometimes referred to as ‘The Madonna’ of Bachelor’s Grove.
Inset upper: The wooded path that leads to the cemetery.
Inset Middle: The headstone the apparition was seen sitting on.
Inset Lower: The gates of Bachelor’s Grove circa 1980

For more information about all things paranormal, strange, dark and macabre through articles, discussions, podcasts, videos and competitions visit The Paranormal Guide:
www.facebook.com/theparanormalguide

Want even more?
Visit our forums at www.theparanormalguide.net

Note: The Paranormal Guide makes no claims to the authenticity or integrity of this photo. It is simply presented here along with information for you to make up your own mind.

 

Media Influence on Paranormal Perception



Contributed by :

Desmond Wong
Manager
Singapore Paranormal Investigators

 

BOTTLES TREE WORSHIP

Written by SPI team, edited by John Kwok, PhD candidate, History researcher

[pictures will be included soon]   

“Sacred” Trees in Singapore

In 2007, a road accident involving a roadside African Mahogany tree at Jurong in Singapore was published in the local press. The focus however, was not the tragedy of the accident, but the tree after its bark was stripped off as a result of the accident and revealed what looked like the head of two monkeys. Local Singaporeans interpreted it to mean a deity living in the tree. Dubbed the Monkey Tree, it inspired local cults to worship at the tree for good fortune, especially praying for winning lottery numbers. Devotees left offerings at the tree and the crowds of people to gather to make them often resulted in human and traffic congestion, much to the displeasure of the residents neighbourhood.

The Monkey Tree was popular in Singapore, but it was by no means a unique phenomena. SPI has discovered that another tree in Singapore, while not as popular as the Monkey Tree, featured evidence of tree worship. This tree was located in the heart of Singapore’s CBD at the junction of Kepple Road and Anson. It was not difficult to spot this tree for it stands at a busy junction.

Of the many trees that line the Tanjong Pagar Complex, this one in particularly, near some office buildings and a hawker centre, was donned with dozens of water bottles hung from its branches. SPI agents made some enquiry from passers-by and office workers nearby. Surprisingly, most did not pay much attention to it or failed to notice the strangely decorated tree entirely. Indeed, it begs the question, why was this tree decorated in such a manner?

Observations

Each water bottle was connected to another by a long strip of orange coloured string. Each pair of bottles was hung from branches on the tree and was neatly spaced out; they were not clustered in one bunch. Each bottle was also filled and capped with a clear liquid, believed to be water. There were 32 bottles altogether – strung into 16 pairs. The conditions of the bottles suggest that they were all put up at the same time; there were uniform levels of corrosion on them.

Furthermore, from physical examinations of the bottles, it appeared that they were recently strung up and hung on the tree. Further indications came from the contents of the bottles; the liquid was clear and showed only minute traces of contamination by pollution and weathering. This indicates that the bottles were all hung at one effort, possibly even by the same person or organisation. However, when empty bottles and string were found tucked and hidden away behind the tree, it suggests that more bottles would be progressively added to it, possibly in stages.

In addition to the hanging bottles were several decorated bottles placed near the tree. One in particularly featured detailed flower patterns and made to resemble a lantern. Another, in contrast, also resembled a lantern but was crudely made with plastic rings cut from mineral water bottles and joined together. At the foot of the tree was a strange object made from metal wire. The wire was skilfully woven into a circular object with the ends left sticking up, resembling a pair of pointed horns. A red make-shift tassel was attached to each end of the horns. In front of this strange object were burnt joss sticks stuck on the ground.

There were also traces of joss papers and evidence that a large scale type of offering ritual had been performed at the tree. It reminds one of the offerings made to spirits during the Hungry Ghost festival. It is likely that the wire-framed object was representative of a tree deity or powerful spirit. But while tree worshipping or the making of offerings to spirits at nature objects is commonly performed in Singapore, the main feature of the tree, the practice of hanging filled bottles on a tree is not.

The Investigation

The bottles, filled liquid and hanging from the branches of the tree, reminds some SPI agents of the famous Wishing Tree in Hong Kong. Kenny recalled during a previous case that took him to visit the Wishing Tree in Hong Kong years ago:

The minute we alighted from our vehicle, crowds of aunties rushed up to me asking to buy their joss-sticks. They thought that we wanted to see the Wishing Tree and to toss on it a pair of oranges, tied together by a long red string, for good luck. We quickly and successfully avoided them and instead made our way directly to a make-shift counter set up near a large joss-stick urn.

A devotee at the counter quoted me several categories of prices for their iconic wish-making oranges that come with a stack of joss papers for burning as offerings. The prices reflected the types of wishes one would like to make i.e. individual blessings, family blessings or blessings for success in business. Each type of blessing commands a different price. And they did not come cheap. Blessings start at HKD88 and could climb to HKD1388. I was astonished that a pair of oranges and a small stack of joss papers could command such prices and wondered if I could bring my own offerings. After all, it’s the same kind of offering we are making to the same tree.

It is unfortunate that making a wish or requests for blessings have been turned into well-oiled money making scheme at the Wishing Tree. Elsewhere, making wishes were accompanied by a simple gesture of tossing a coin into a well or fountain. Fortunately, however, recently I have heard that the Hong Kong Wishing Tree is now better regulated with the emphasis on preserving it as a unique local cultural tradition.

When Kenny saw the filled bottles hanging from the tree in Singapore, he immediately drew parallels with the Wishing Tree in Hong Kong.

1. Evidence of burnt offerings at the foot of the tree reinforces the notion that this tree is recognised as auspicious or special like the Wishing Tree or the Monkey Tree mentioned earlier.

2. Oranges are regarded as symbolic representations of wealth, prosperity and good fortune. These are also popular wishes made by believers at the Wishing Tree. There is also a popular belief at the Wishing Tree that the higher the throw and the higher the orange is caught on the tree branches, one’s wishes would be better heard by spirits and the greater possibility that that one’s wishes would be fulfilled.

Singaporeans may have also adopted the tradition of tossing auspicious items on an auspicious tree. Instead of tossing a pair of oranges strung by a long red string up the tree for good luck, local Singaporeans toss instead bottles of water. A former SPI Cultural specialist believes that these bottles were a symbolic representation of a vessel that hold the dreams and wishes of one making the offering. However, there is a more plausible explanation that stem from the symbol of the oranges in Hong Kong; water in local Chinese culture represents wealth and fortune.

The person or organisation who hung the bottles on the tree in Singapore was very likely mimicking practices from the popular and famous Wishing Tree in Hong Kong. The Money Tree in Hong Kong proved very popular in terms of tourism dollars and the bottle tree in Singapore could be an attempt to reproduce similar results in Singapore.

The Consequence

However, the creators of the bottle tree in Singapore may not be aware that their activities have broken the law on littering in Singapore. According to the Environmental Public Health Act, it is an offense to litter at any public place or public street. The items left on and around the tree can be interpreted as litter. Littering as an offence in Singapore carries a maximum fine of S$1,000 for the first offence and S$2,000 for a subsequent offence. The offence may be compounded for S$150 if it is a first offense – the offender must attend a 15 minute briefing on how littering can harm the environment. In 1992, the EPH (Corrective Work Order) (CWO) Regulations was passed, under which litterers may be required to clean up a public place. As from Feb. 2, 1996, the power to arrest those who litter was extended to operators of public vehicles. In 1999, the number of hours which a person may be required to work under a CWO was increased from 3 hours to a maximum of 12 hours, but not exceeding 3 hours per day.

Will the creators of the bottle tree in Singapore return and continue what they started? Or have they realised the gravity of their activities in terms of breaking the law? SPI will keep you updated with these strange hanging bottles.

Tree worship is a cultural belief that worshippers will receive blessings from spirits. Such spirits may directly reside in trees or through the tree they can be communicated in other realms. The spirits can reward worshippers of material requests such as winning lotteries or other wealth. Sometimes the tree spirits can give protection, for example healing illness or safety in transportation.

Tree worship is a matter of worshipping physical objects that is deemed nothing but superstition in skeptics’ eyes. Chinese religious folk beliefs are full of such magical stuffs. In ancient times, when indigenous people did not understand science, plus the fear from the natural environments around them, they placed huge respects on things that are larger than life or relate to their daily survival, such as thunder, rain, moon, sun, mountains, trees etc. Such respects became the primitive elements of shamanism and animism for hoping of some supernatural power would protect them against threats and dangers, that later evolved into a cultural practice. They worshiped most if not all natural substances from stone idols to biological plants and animals (ox, tiger, monkey, snake gods), often in admiration of their physical strengths.

Such physical strengths that appear greater than that of human which might be not understood (or explained) scientifically, were imagined to carry supernatural powers by our ancestors in the old days.